Melanie Miller Himmel

INSTRUCTOR

Born in Sydney, Australia, but raised in Southern California in a musical family, Melanie Miller-Himmel began playing piano at age 8, and then flute at age 10. She obtained a Bachelor of Music degree in Flute Performance from San Diego State University, graduating magna cum laude, having studied with Claude Monteux and Demarre McGill. Before graduating, she began freelancing and teaching around San Diego County. She has served on the board of directors of the San Diego Flute Guild, and has been a longtime member of the Music Teacher’s Association of California (MTAC). Her students have participated in MTAC’s Certificate of Merit program (a comprehensive program involving theory, technique, ear training, and performance), and have gone on to pursue music in many different forms (as music majors, minors, and often simply as a form of stress relief and creative outlet). She now calls Boston home, as she is pursuing a Doctorate in Occupational Therapy at BU – seeking to ultimately blend her love of music with her desire to help people pursue meaningful occupations.

Birthday: February 14th❤

Schools Attended: San Diego State University

Instruments You Teach: Flute, Piccolo, Piano, Voice

Age you Started Lessons: Piano age 8, Flute age 10

Performance Experience: several years freelancing around Southern California (church services, chamber orchestras, weddings, corporate events, chamber music)

Favorite Music to Listen to: depends on my mood…I like a little bit of everything

Favorite Music to Play: each day is different (sometimes I even like playing scales!)

Other hobbies/interests: Yoga, running, ballet, reading, traveling, and long walks with my teacup chihuahua, Coco

Something most people don’t know about you: My first language was not English (even though it’s the one I am most fluent in)

Where you were born/grew up: born in Sydney, Australia, grew up in San Diego, CA

Practice Tips: if it’s too overwhelming or tricky start small (even 3-4 notes at a time) – practicing in small chunks and then puzzle-piecing them back together can make a world of a difference!